January 22, 2014

Jewlyes Gutierrez, an open transgender student in Contra Costa County, has been the center of constant harassment and bullying by her peers. Gutierrez  has been charged with misdemeanor battery for defending herself against a physical attack by three girls at Hercules High School that took place on November 13. The dispute surrounding the incident has fueled national headlines and sparked an online petition in support of Gutierrez. Family members and supporters are encouraging the Contra Costa County Superior Court to drop the criminal charges against the transgender teen.

 

Whether the students targeted this girl because she is transgender or for some unknown reason, filing charges against her sends the wrong message to LGBTQ youth. Putting an already vulnerable person through criminal prosecution does not solve the problem. We must look into what the causation for the attack was and start there. Because the school administration did not properly address the situation and no necessary action was put in place to safeguard her, Gutierrez was forced to take matters into her own hands.  No student should be in fear of their physical safety due to who they are.

 

Violence against LGBTQ youth is a serious problem. As a student who lives and attends school in Contra Costa County, I found it worrisome to hear the news of an individual being a victim of bullying and facing harsh penalties for standing up for herself, with no similar claim taken against the attackers. It is already difficult for any student to stand up against bullies. Tackling violence in schools is not a ‘first step’ that has the potential to launch more conversation; it is, right now, an eclipsing step, that has allowed us to overlook the core causes of harassment faced by LGBTQ youth.

 

No youth should feel the need to use brute force to protect themselves. School should be a safe and inclusive environment for every student. Hopefully Gutierrez will find justice, but sadly her situation is all too similar to the many struggles faced by LGBTQ youth across the nation. This incident serves as a teachable lesson to value and respect all individuals regardless of their sexuality or gender identity and expression.

 

Matthew Y. is a high school junior and a GLSEN Student Ambassador. 

January 17, 2014

GLSEN student leaders all over the country continue to make a difference even after they graduate from high school. One former Ambassador has brought his story to a national public service campaign to help students across the country who have faced similar challenges. 

Characters Unite is USA Network's public service program advocating for an end to social injustice and cultural intolerance. The campaign invites athletes, actors and other public figures to speak about causes that matter to them, such as religious tolerance, diversity, and ending violence and hate crimes. 

In a recent video for the campaign, Joey Kemmerling, a former GLSEN Student Ambassador, sits down with NFL player Victor Cruz to talk about the bullying he faced for being gay. Kemmerling, 19, tells Cruz about coming out in middle school and facing harassment from his peers, particularly in locker rooms and in school sports, and how school administrators didn't take any actions to help him. 

"When I was 13, I knew that I was gay and I told about five people, but overnight it went from five people to the entire school knowing. I didn't realize that until I walked into the locker room and everyone stopped and stared at me," he tells Cruz. "After I came out, the locker room was the last place I wanted to be."

Cruz, a wide receiver for the New York Giants, faced discrimination growing up for his mixed-race heritage. He gave Kemmerling a tour of the Giants' locker room, and the two talked about how it felt to grow up feeling cast aside from their peers -- and how speaking out has helped them overcome problems from their pasts. 

"It means so much more to me now to know that I'm here and to know that I can share this moment, which makes it that much better," Kemmerling says. "I found a voice and I overcame it, and I'm taking the next step on my journey."

Cruz was clearly touched by Kemmerling's story. 

"More and more players want to make a change and want to step out and be a voice," he tells Kemmerling. "Hearing your story honestly has changed my life and changed my outlook."

We're so proud to work with Joey and see how far he's come. Make sure to check out the video

November 13, 2013

What’s in a name? It’s a loaded question for the students of Goodkind High School, who refer to their Gay-Straight Alliance as the Geography Club to keep it a secret from the rest of their school.Nikki Blonsky

Opening in theaters Friday, “Geography Club” is a new film that tackles anti-LGBT bullying through the eyes of students determined to make a difference in their high school. The movie is an adaptation of Brett Hartinger’s novel of the same name. Among the talented cast are Nikki Blonsky, best known for her role as Tracy Turnblad in the 2007 musical film “Hairspray,” and Alex Newell, who came into the spotlight recently playing transgender teenager Unique Adams on “Glee.”

GLSEN had the amazing opportunity to talk to Nikki, who performed at GLSEN’s Respect Awards – New York in 2011 and has been an active supporter of LGBT rights throughout her career. We spoke with Nikki on the phone about her own experiences with bullying, her connection to the cause, and how she prepared for her role as a punk-y lesbian teenager. Interview has been edited and condensed.

GLSEN: What about this movie first caught your attention?

Nikki Blonsky: I read the script and I said to myself, “This movie is so different. This movie is what kids need to see now.” This movie stands for everything I believe in. My gay fans have been extremely supportive of me – all my fans have – but I wanted to do this in honor of them. I wanted to step in their shoes for the movie and portray somebody in their community, to say I got as close as I could to the experience of living life as a lesbian.

Did you have any discussions with the other actors about the issues that are covered in the film?

We did. The night before we were going to start filming, I called the girl who plays my girlfriend, and I had only met her once before. I said, “I just want to talk to you about tomorrow. I want it to be really authentic. This isn’t about two women or two men, it’s about two people loving each other. So if we can find that love for each other just as humans and portray that, then I think we’ll be golden.” I told her we were an open book from here on out. From that day on, it was easy-breezy with her on set.

What was the most memorable part of working on the movie?

My look is very different in this movie. Between the cornrows and the leather jacket and the hoops and the Doc Martins and the chains, it’s nothing I’ve done before, and that’s thrilling to me. But probably my favorite part of this movie is sticking up for the kid who gets bullied all the time. I get right in front of the football players’ faces and give them a little bit of my mind, That, and learning the play the guitar in two days. I’m not Carlos Santana, but I learned a few things.

Can you describe your character, Terese, and how she fits into the story?

Terese is Min’s girlfriend, and they create this boring-sounding club called Geography Club because they figure nobody will want to join it, but that’s where all the LGBT kids are. Terese creates this really hard shell with the way she dresses, and the way she gives this look in her eye. She’s so afraid of people cracking that shell and seeing the soft, lovable Terese that’s inside, and I think that’s absolutely what so many kids do nowadays. I think Terese’s role is to protect the kids in the Geography Club and also to protect herself and her heart, and to show people not to judge a book by its cover.

Has bullying ever affected you? How?

I was bullied my entire school career, from elementary school all the way up – middle school was probably the worst time of my life – and I still get bullied to this day. I get mean-tweeted all the time, whether it’s about my weight, my height, my this, my that. A long time ago, my grandma taught me that people make fun of you because they’re insecure with themselves. When people mean-tweet me or when somebody says something to me, I don’t even respond. No matter how hard we all try, we’re not perfect, we’re never going be perfect. And if we were perfect, what fun would that be? Normal’s no fun.

Geography Club Movie Nikki BlonskyDid you bring any of that experience to your portrayal of Terese?

I brought that all to my character. When people say mean stuff to me [as Terese] or look at me weird, I give them this attitude, like, “Who gives a crap about you, anyway? What horse did you ride in on?” She doesn’t have time for them and neither does the school. She never verbalizes it, but she looks at them and her little snark and giggle is more than they can handle.

Given your experiences, what advice would you give to kids who are bullied?

When somebody pushes you up against a locker or says something bad to you, just look at them and laugh them in the face. That will piss them off to the highest extreme. It’s telling them, “Your words don’t bother me. You’re wasting your breath.”

Your character in the film is afraid to come out. How do you think that will resonate with viewers?

Way before this movie, my closest cousin visited me while I was doing Hairspray. He said, “Hey, can I talk to you about something?” We went in another room and he said, “You’re the first person I’m telling because you’re the closest person to me. I’m gay.” And I hugged him, and he said, “Are you OK with it?” I said, “Are you kidding me? I love you and I want you to live the best, happiest life you can. I don’t care who you decide to partner up with, I just want you to be happy. If anything, I will hook you up with one of the most beautiful dancers in the movie.” Coming out is a scary thing. I couldn’t imagine doing it myself, but the people who do show us what real strength is and real courage is.

Why is it important to you to speak out about anti-LGBT bullying?

There have unfortunately been so many kids not knowing where to turn, not having an ally or anywhere to go to talk about these issues. When Geography Club comes out, I feel if everybody watched it the first week of high school, it would make things so much easier for the next four years. I think that kids just need an outlet, and parents could be a little more vocal with their kids. I’ve always been extremely vocal with my parents; I talked to them about every single thing, and I still do. You can still have your privacy, but talk to them, because they’re the ones who have been there since the beginning and they’ll be there till the end.

What message do you hope audiences will take from the film?

I hope audiences take away that love isn’t about gender. I hope audiences realize that this goes on in schools every single day across the nation and the world, and we need to stop it. And I think audiences, even adults who bully other adults, need to realize we have one shot at life, so why would you waste your time bullying another person? And it’s a funny movie at the same time. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and you’ll want to see it again.

That’s true! And there aren’t many movies out there like it.

That’s what I’m so proud about. People are finally taking this seriously and saying, "Hey, it’s a movie about today’s generation, we’re going to put it on a big screen." Everyone in a movie theater is going to see two guys kissing, two girls kissing, so what? That’s today’s generation. I’m so proud to be a part of this movie because I think it can do so much for this generation. I just hope everybody watches it. If every single person who sees it takes a little bit from the film, we’ll have done our jobs.

October 08, 2013

GLSEN Student Ambassadors

This August, GLSEN Student Ambassadors attended a screening of HBO's new documentary "Valentine Road." We invited them to share their experiences and reactions to the film as it is released to general audiences.

GLSEN Student Ambassador Paulina AldabaHave you ever seen a film that moves you so much, you leave the room a different person?

That is what happened to me this past August when I had the opportunity to watch HBO’s documentary “Valentine Road.” This film follows the aftermath of the murder of Lawrence King, a 15-year-old student who was killed by one of his classmates in 2008.

Watching this documentary was an extremely emotional process for me. In my life, I try and surround myself with supportive people. My friends and family help me feel safe, and I cannot imagine where I would be without their support. Knowing that a kid was brutally murdered as a result of homophobia and transphobia is heartbreaking, but it all gets worse once you see the people who disagree. Valentine Road showcased all sides of the story, from his friends and supporters to the prejudiced teachers, jurors and members of the community who believed Larry deserved his death. I was angry and sad, but also very inspired.

Larry’s death was a tragedy, and sadly it is only one of the many that happen every day around the world. And that is why we need to keep working every day to change the hearts and minds of those who still believe that being who you are is wrong. After watching “Valentine Road,” I wanted to make a change, and I knew that this was not going to happen unless I worked hard every day.

Sadly, we still live in a world full of hate, and this is why watching this documentary is a must for everyone. As horrifying as it can be, it is important that we all know such crimes occur, because looking the other way won’t make them go away.  So, understanding that this film is very emotional and crude, I believe that everyone should watch it, and I strongly encourage anyone to see it with a proper support system in place. This film changed me for the better, and I am so thankful I had the opportunity to watch it.

Paulina Aldaba is a GLSEN Student Ambassador. 

October 04, 2013

GLSEN Student Ambassadors

This August, GLSEN Student Ambassadors attended a screening of HBO's upcoming documentary "Valentine Road." We invited them to share their experiences and reactions to the film leading up to its official release.

GLSEN Student Ambassador Liam ArneStunned. Appalled. Riveted. Frightened. Enraged. Energized to demand change.

I experienced all of these feelings and more during GLSEN’s Student Ambassador Summit in August while viewing the groundbreaking documentary "Valentine Road," about the senseless murder of young Lawrence King. As one of the first youth to see this emotionally charged film before its official release on October 7, I had a unique glimpse at its extremely disturbing and sensitive material.

No matter how much the subject matter horrified me, I am definitely changed for the better having seen the depths some can go to punish alleged violations of gender roles and expectations, even those of a 15-year-old child. It has given me even more drive to rectify King’s death and make sure that such a purely homophobic/transphobic murder may never occur again.

As angry as I was to see many of the testimonials of prejudiced teachers or jurors and the results of the trial of Larry’s killer, the film did not simply blame Brandon McInerney for his crime. Instead, the documentary chose to analyze the story from both sides of the gun, providing a complete tableau of the factors which contributed to Larry’s murder. It left no stone unturned, addressing homophobia and transphobia, racial prejudice, class, abusive histories, family and community support, mental illness, school violence, the failings of the “justice” system, safe schools legislation, and the complications of age in the eyes of the court, among other issues.

"Valentine Road" is a must-see for GSAs and other similar school or community clubs. However, the nature of the film is wrought with emotion and sensitive material. In fact, I was so affected that I cried in the theater, and I was most certainly not alone. Thus, GSAs should be careful before showing this powerful film to students. A safe space filled with ample amounts of tissues, love, and support is required before anyone sees the film.

Most of all, I deeply recommend that a time be provided to discuss its themes and details, whether that be directly following the film showing or a week or more afterward, though, frankly, I would recommend both. This way, immediate reactions may be shared in addition to feelings that emerge after an audience has had time to process the film.

This documentary empowered me to continue my crusade to support LGBTQ* students in and out of our nation’s schools, and I am thankful to have seen it. Please consider watching it to learn more about the life-and-death situation of bullying and discrimination facing LGBTQ* students, the brief but impactful life of Lawrence King, and what you can do to make a difference for students at risk.

Liam Arne is a GLSEN Student Ambassador.

September 18, 2013

Student Ambassadors Header

GLSEN Student Ambassador Jada GossettIf someone told me three years ago that I would be a pansexual LGBT activist, I would have never believed it. I remember the times when I would sit in my room and just seethe at the fact that I wasn’t entirely sure about my sexuality. I didn’t like a particular set of people, and even if I had a “type” I was attracted to, it wasn’t enough to make a decision. I had never come out as any sexuality up until a year ago when I learned about the other sexualities that didn’t quite make it to the ever-growing acronym. Ever since that day, I can only remember positive thoughts about my sexuality and how it really suits me.

I just started my senior year in high school and the time has flown by faster than I can even fathom.

When I started school as a freshman, I was excited to join my school’s Gay-Straight Alliance. It was one the main reasons I chose to attend the school that I will be graduating from in just a few months. This year is a very big year for me and my GSA because I’m finally stepping up and taking the reins on the club. Ever since I started high school, I have talked to many different teachers and other youth coordinators about how to make the GSA more active, but now that I have years of experience, I know exactly what we’re going to do to make our club known at school.

All summer I’ve been planning monthly events to do with the GSA and trying to get club members’ feedback on how to make my plans work for everyone. So far I have a calendar full of themed months based on Days of Action, remembrance days, and LGBT topics in general. Once clubs start up for the year, I hope to add some kind of educational component to the GSA to teach students about LGBT issues and what the club means. My school is a very liberal school that allows free gender expression and sexual orientation, so I have no doubt that once this is implemented, people will be more interested in being a part of the GSA.

I think it’s important for students to actually learn about human sexuality outside of the standard health class lectures. I would love to see teachers including LGBT figures in their lesson plans no matter what subject they teach. I remember when my ninth-grade English teacher had my class read the story “Am I Blue?” from the book of the same title. That was my first real experience of talking about being LGBT in an open environment and I will never forget it. It would mean so much to me if there were more people able to experience that. 

While it’s a bittersweet feeling to be a senior, I can only enjoy everything that comes my way this year and hope that all my memories of being a high school student can help inspire other people.

Jada Gossett is a GLSEN Student Ambassador. 

September 13, 2013

GLSEN Student Ambassadors

GLSEN Student Ambassador Andrew LawlessSchool started a month ago in my district. Students’ alarms started ringing sooner than they did during the summer, bringing life and smiles to lonely bathroom mirrors. Toaster pastries and cereal began to fill bellies once again in the familiar morning routine as students began their days.

However, I wasn’t so thrilled about school because I was all too familiar with the unsafe feeling of being openly gay in a rural area. I knew that this would be my last year and my community has a lot of growing to do through policies, community involvement, and setting up and maintaining safe zones within my school. With that thought in mind, I also know that I am leaving behind a changed school and an improved atmosphere because of my GSA and through allies I have gained, who will advocate on behalf of all of my LGBTQ peers.

The GLSEN Middle Tennessee chapter has already started planning and hosting events around days of action such as Ally Week. To kick things off, GLSEN Middle TN co-hosted an Ally Week Photo Shoot Campaign on September 11 with the Music City Sisters and Out & About Nashville, which celebrates 11 years in October as Middle Tennessee's leader in LGBT news. The event was for supportive community members to show their support for Tennessee students and proclaim their commitment to being an ally!  

Those who couldn’t make it to the event don’t have to miss out on the fun, though. GLSEN Middle TN also encourages everyone who wants to participate to print off an Ally Week sign and post it on the GLSEN Middle TN Facebook page, post it on Instagram with the hashtag #AllyWeek2013, tweet their photo to @OutandAboutNash and @GLSENMiddleTN, or email it directly to middletn@chapters.glsen.org

The photos from the campaign will be featured in the October 2013 edition of Out and About Nashville and support our next Ally Week event, which will be held during Ally Week on October 24! GLSEN Middle TN will be co-hosting their next event with the Nashville GLBT Chamber of Commerce.  

GLSEN Middle TN is thankful for all of its sponsors and co-hosts, without whom events like these would be nearly impossible. There will be more events on the agenda for the coming year, which I am looking forward to participating in and helping to organize! By engaging the public in initiatives like Ally Week and other days of action, GLSEN Middle TN is able to make an impact on the greater community and change schools in Tennessee.

Though I am leaving for college in the coming year, opening myself to new opportunities, and gaining more knowledge alongside GLSEN, I couldn’t be happier to look around and see the community that I will be leaving progressing in the right direction. Middle Tennessee is on a path to safer and more inclusive schools and I am happy to be a part of the great work GLSEN is doing in my area.

Andrew Lawless is a GLSEN Student Ambassador and GLSEN Middle Tennessee leader. 

September 12, 2013

GLSEN Student Ambassadors

GLSEN Student Ambassador Dustin

As a high school student, going back to school can be both stressful and exciting. You don't know what to expect, but in your head you make a whole bunch of assumptions, some negative and some positive. Being a gay high school student and going back to school, the only thing you truly want is to have a great year with people who accept and love you for who you are.

I attend a high school that just opened about a year ago, and in addition to the school a new club was born: a Gay-Straight Alliance. My GSA started with three people and we are gradually building up week by week. Our main goal is to bring more awareness about LGBT issues and, of course, create an alliance between our gay and straight students in hopes we can create a safe environment for all our students. 

I personally would like to see more encouragement from teachers. I have always been told by my teachers to get good grades and excel academically, but I am never told to be myself and to embrace who I am as a gay student. I would like to see more teachers inspiring students who are LGBT to be themselves, giving them a sense of security and giving them a friend, someone who they can come to for whatever reason. 

On the other hand, there are numerous things students can do to make back-to-school pleasant and stress-free for LGBT students. Instead of following the crowd and automatically ignoring the students who are different from them, students can do the simplest of things, like not making insulting comments about one’s actions or appearance (thinking before they speak) or asking students who are alone at lunch if they would like to sit with them. The most effective thing they could do is smile when they see an LGBT student. Little heartwarming gestures can be the best way to start off a new school year.

As this is my last year being a high school student, there are a few things I want to achieve before the school year is over. Mainly, I would like to set a foundation at my school: a legacy where people are not ashamed to be who they are, but in reality are more than happy embracing their sexuality. I also really hope I can achieve a lot with my GSA club this year, most importantly by informing the students of issues faced by the LGBT community in hopes they will be inspired to help us make a difference. The ultimate and last thing I hope to achieve this school year is to find and apply to a college which has an amazing GSA. After high school is done, I want to continue to be a representative, an advocate, and a voice for my fellow LGBT community. 

In conclusion, being a gay high school student might come to an end, but my future being an LGBT representative is soon to begin. 

Dustin Gallegos is a GLSEN Student Ambassador. 

September 11, 2013

Kat Spot the Sticker CampaignWhen I was bullied for a few years, I didn't feel safe at school. I was unhappy, sad, and uncomfortable. I would try pretending to be sick to not go to school. In one year, I missed 95 days of school for fear of being bullied. 

I thought that when I started in a new grade in an upper-level school, everything would change. I would have friends, sit at a lunch table with friends, and be able to socialize and gossip about favorite pets and favorite boy bands. But when I started sixth grade, it didn't change at all. I was still bullied. Everyone except two people—one who is a lesbian, and another who was gay—wouldn't talk to me.

The only place where I felt safe and could eat my lunch was the library. I could talk to the librarian and help students check out books and show them where to find books.

Then in seventh grade, we got a new librarian, one who is a strong supporter of GLSEN and the LGBT community. I still hung out in the library and helped with the students. Then a few weeks later, she put up a Safe Space poster on her bulletin board. As soon as I saw that poster, I knew I was safe in the library.

When school started this year, I walked past the principal's office; I noticed that he also had a Safe Space sticker on his window. I was surprised that he had a sticker on his window. When I saw that poster and sticker, I finally knew I was safe at school. Safe to be myself, safe to come out about my sexuality. Perfectly safe. I could be free.

Katarina “Kat” S. is an eighth-grader at the Creative and Performing Media Arts School (CPMA) in San Diego, California. 

September 11, 2013

GLSEN Spot the Sticker Campaign

Today, GLSEN announced the launch of its #SpotTheSticker campaign, an endeavor to recognize, highlight and celebrate the thousands of schools where LGBT students can feel safe, affirmed and respected.

The GLSEN Safe Space sticker and poster are important components of the Safe Space Kit, a resource guide for educators to become better allies to LGBT students. Three years ago, GLSEN launched the Safe Space Campaign, with the goal of putting a Safe Space Kit in every middle and high school in the country – all 60,000 of them. As we prepare to wrap up the Safe Space Campaign this October, we’re celebrating by spreading the word about the huge number of educators and community members who show support for LGBT students.

Participating in the #SpotTheSticker campaign is easy, and anyone can do it. First, find a Safe Space sticker or poster at school, at work, at your local community center, or anywhere else. Then, just snap a picture. You can take a photo of the sticker alone, a selfie with the sticker in the background, your GSA posing with the sticker—be creative! Finally, upload the picture to glsen.org/spotthesticker and share it on social media using the hashtag #SpotTheSticker. It’s that simple: just spot it, snap it and share it!

When you take and share a photo, you encourage educators to put up their own Safe Space stickers and posters, sending a message of support to LGBT youth across the country. You’ll also be spreading the word about the value of GLSEN’s Safe Space Kit. GLSEN research has shown that having visible allies at school improves LGBT students’ academic achievement, aspirations for the future and personal well-being. By participating in the #SpotTheSticker campaign, you can help show educators nationwide just how important it is to support LGBT youth.

For more information about #SpotTheSticker, check out glsen.org/spotthesticker and follow the hashtag #SpotTheSticker on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. We can’t wait to see where you find stickers!

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