February 20, 2014

The Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence is being held in Austin, Texas from March 20th - 22nd this year. Will you be there? Members of GLSEN's Research Department will be! Here's their presentation schedule:

GLSEN SRA 2014 schedule

Hope to see you in Austin, but if you can only be there in spirit, be sure to follow @GLSENResearch!

February 11, 2014

We're excited to announce a Call for Nominations for our GSA of the Year Award! Do you know a Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) or a similar student group that has accomplished amazing things to advance or address LGBT issues in their school this year? We want to hear about them!

The GLSEN GSA of the Year Award recognizes and celebrates a GSA for its outstanding work and commitment to advocating and organizing around LGBT issues in their school. You can nominate the GSA at your school or another GSA who has done great work that you want to bring to national attention.

GSAs are student-led clubs that help to ensure middle and high schools offer a safe and affirming environment for all students. GLSEN has supported GSAs for more than 20 years, and more than 4,000 GSAs are currently registered with GLSEN.

NOMINATE AN UBER FIERCE GSA RIGHT NOW!

All nominations are due by 11:59pm ET on Friday, February 21, 2014. Only K-12 schools located in the United States are eligible.

 

February 06, 2014

A bill to allow more religious expression by students in Virginia public schools is scheduled to go before a house subcommittee today. A similar version of this bill passed the senate earlier this year, but advocates are still calling for action.

The Richmond area chapter of GLSEN sent out an alert this morning asking for people to “support the right of students to engage in free speech activities,” but realize “this legislation will result in school sanctioned religious speech that is both inappropriate and dangerously unconstitutional.”

The language of the bill, HB 493, details how public schools could, if passed, create policies to allow students to express religious beliefs.

“The policy shall declare each such school event to be a limited public forum, provide a neutral method for the selection of student speakers, and require each school principal to provide a disclaimer in advance of each such school event that the school division does not endorse any religious viewpoint that may be expressed by student speakers.”

Don’t let the innocuous language of the bill fool you, however, according to GLSEN, the bill’s goal of religious freedom hides a more sinister mission.

“The bill would… disrupt campaigns, activities, and programs such as the Annual Day of Silence. The public school system should not be in the business of promoting speech that violates the First Amendment, nor should they seek policies that would coerce students to participate in particular beliefs. ” said Richmond GLSEN in the alert.

Senator Adam Ebbin (D-Alexandria) released a statement condemning this kind of legislation last month when a similar bill, SB236, passed the Senate floor.

“This bill purports to promote religious freedom for all, but rather would give the religious majority the opportunity to promote its own sectarian religious beliefs to the exclusion of others – intended or not,” said Senator Ebbin . “Prayers are unlikely to be from anything but the majority religion. It’s about who is called on to speak, who is not called on to speak … and who is forced to listen.”

The ACLU of Virginia echoed Ebbin’s concerns saying the bill was unnecessary and would tread in unconstitutional territory.

“It would subject students to religious coercion in a limitless range of settings, including those which the Constitution already prohibits, e.g., prayers over the loudspeaker at football games and reciting Bible verses during morning announcements,” said the ACLU in a release about the bill.

The Senate version passed by a 20-18 vote across party lines, but before Lt. Gov Northam and AG Herring’s Senate seats were filled. The Senate bill is expected to pass the conservative House, but its final fate will be determined by Gov. Terry McAuliffe. The Governor could veto the bill, and with the now-full senate stacked 10-10 even on party lines and Democrat LT. Gov. Northam, an override of the Veto could fail.

Today’s house committee vote would put HB 493 before the House which it will surely pass, but the bill is expected to fail the now even Senate with Northam casting the tie breaking vote.

Article by Brad Kutner

Editor in Chief at GayRVA.com based in Richmond, VA.
Original text can be found here

January 28, 2014

Are you attending the 26th National Conference on LGBT Equality: Creating Change this week in Houston? Make sure to stop by GLSEN's table and workshops throughout the conference! 

Here's a schedule of where you can find us:

 

GLSEN Creating Change 2014

 

Don't forget to follow GLSEN on Twitter and Facebook for updates and use the hashtags #CC14 and #SafeSchools! 

January 27, 2014

When you are young and queer in Mexico, coming out is not an option.

I was born and raised in Durango, a relatively conservative state in which the mere topic of homosexuality is rarely discussed. Like most kids, growing up, I didn't know what being gay really meant. I was simply told that this was a very bad thing, a way for Satan to separate us from God, and that I didn't have anything to worry about, because I wasn't “one of them.”

As I grew older, homophobic slurs became a staple of everyone’s vocabulary. I never knew anyone who was out, and no one in my grade ever mentioned any sort of doubts about their sexuality. As far as everyone was concerned, we were all straight. During my time there, many of my teachers felt the need to express their opinions and it was not uncommon for them to say hurtful things about LGBT people. For example: “Even though you should be respectful, this is wrong and you should not do it.” Or: “Let’s face it; humans live their lives looking for excitement. Once you feel like you've tried everything and you are bored with your life, people become gay, which is why there are so many gay celebrities.”

This was widely accepted by my classmates. It created an extremely unsafe environment, where bullying and harassment towards members of the LGBT community were seen as normal and acceptable.

When I got to tenth grade, I decided to move to the United States, looking for a more diverse and accepting place to live, and to this day, that has been the best decision I have made. The first time I walked on campus, I noticed a bulletin board for my school’s Gay-Straight Alliance. I was very surprised by it, but I couldn’t have been happier. As I walked around campus, many doors had Safe Space stickers. Later that same day, I got to meet my adviser, who is an openly gay man, and I learned that he was just one of many in our school. These things may have seemed small for a lot of people, but they meant the world to me. I had never heard of anything like this before, but I immediately knew that I had finally found a place where I could be safe.

Today, I am incredibly grateful for both of my experiences. Being in Mexico was hard, but it taught me a lot about what it means to be queer, and it made me more sensitive to other people's identities and their struggles. It helped me become stronger, and gave me something to fight for. I will be graduating from Rutgers Prep this June, and I am really happy to be a part of this community. Attending a school that allowed me to be who I am helped me to form a strong identity, and to become a much happier person.

Paulina Aldaba is a high school senior at Rutgers Prep and a GLSEN Student Ambassador. 

January 24, 2014

Emet Tauber No Name-Calling Week8 years ago when I was in the 6th grade I had a humanities teacher named Mr. Krause. For our summer reading assignment before middle school started, we had to read The Misfits about a group of middle school students who are picked on and want to do something about it. The kids were picked on and bullied for various things, including being gay, but they had a teacher who supported them and they had each other.

Unknowingly, this book would come to define my 6th grade year. The summer before entering the hallowed halls of Mott Hall II in New York City, I spent the summer at sleep away camp. It was there that I first came out as gay. I was 10 years old and knew nothing of how kids could be so hurtful.

Upon coming to middle school, I began to be bullied. I was teased by my classmates, called hurtful names, and left out of many activities. I barely had any friends, except a few kids, who like me were also teased. We ate in the gym because none of the kids would let us in the lunch tables. We also acted in the school play, and I did the talent show. I did it because I wanted to, and even though everyone laughed at me, I didn’t care and I did it anyway. But the bullying got worse, and even the friends I had weren’t making the difference. While serving as the secretary of the student government, a position I won by antagonizing the voters, I put up a sign asking people to form a club about how much they hate the school. I failed two subjects and was in danger of being held back in school.

My mother was worried about my emotional health, and she didn’t know what to do with me. Eventually, we both decided that I could not stay at that school anymore. Even though it pained me to leave behind the few friends I did have, I knew that it was the best for me. I ended up transferring to a Jewish day school the next year, and was able to function quite well there.

Mr. Krause was an amazing teacher though. He really cared about his students and tried to impart on them how much respect was apart of being a good student. When I left he expressed to my mother that he was distraught and wished he could have done more to help me. Those words I will never forget.

This week is the 10th anniversary of No Name Calling Week, inspired by The Misfits. It’s directed to teachers and students in elementary and middle schools across the country. My story proves that this event and sentiment can help teachers change lives at any age. We must support our educators in their journeys to make schools a safer and better place for all students. It is only in this way that they can continue to shape and change lives.

Emet Tauber is a former GLSEN student ambassador and sophomore at Arcadia University. He serves on GLSEN's National Advisory Council where he helps with programming for Transgender Student Rights. He aspires to get his masters in public policy and work in politics and advocacy as a career.

January 23, 2014

With GLSEN's No Name-Calling Week now in full swing across the country, I find it amazing to reflect on what this event has become in its 10th anniversary year. In 2004, when we launched the first year's activities, we had no idea what it would become. We only knew how critical it was to begin reaching students in the younger grades with LGBT-inclusive messages and curricular materials, to address the cycle of name-calling and disrespect before it escalated to the kinds of violence we'd documented taking place in K-12 schools. Many attacked us for daring to say anything about LGBT issues in materials for younger students, even though it was crystal clear that the problems we raised were old news by the end of elementary school.

After the first year, reports from the field let us know that we'd struck a chord and made a difference. An evaluation of Year One participation found that a majority of students who had taken part in No Name-Calling Week activities reported experiencing, witnessing and perpetrating less name-calling at school afterwards. And the event kept growing, with more and more schools getting their whole communities involved by the time of our Year Four evaluation.

I found it thrilling to see how this crazy idea was turning into a powerful reality. Perhaps the most precious -- and painful -- validation of our commitment came from the words of students themselves. In 2004, The Misfits author James Howe visited Merrill Middle School in Des Moines, Iowa, winner of the first No Name-Calling Week lesson plan contest. In the wake of his visit and speech to the school, he received a flood of messages from Merrill students.

James wrote to me and my colleagues in the most bittersweet terms as he shared the students' words. They were so hard to read, yet gave such concrete confirmation of the importance of this new initiative.

Sometimes I go to the bathroom after lunch and cry like there is no tomorrow. Every night before I go to sleep I cry until I fall asleep. There's been so many times where I didn't want to come to school.

The whole time I've gone to this school I have been called a faggot, been sexually harassed by another student, been asked if I was a girl, and been shunned. I have considered suicide many times.

I was one day being kind of mean to someone to get a lot of laughs and I just realized that this person I was treating like a bug had feelings, too. I wish I would've said sorry.

I liked your speech. It made me think hard. I know that I hate being made fun of and you made me realize that I shouldn't call others names because it really tears them down... Thank you for helping me make a difference.

Their experiences and their commitment to making a difference made me cry.

Over the years, No Name-Calling Week has reached tens of thousands of K-12 classrooms, and is becoming an established part of the school calendar. We've seen concrete progress in reducing the rates of victimization that LGBT students face in school, and we've been able to turn our attention to the positive side of the equation -- celebrating kindness and fostering a culture of respect. That is truly a joy. And as in each of the years over the last decade, I hope GLSEN's No Name-Calling Week and all of our partners in it continue to set kindness on the march, until every corner of every school is illuminated by its warmth.

Eliza Byard, Executive Director

Originally published on the Huffington Post Gay Voices

January 22, 2014

GLSEN and its West Michigan Chapter applaud State Representative Brandon Dillon in introducing a No Name-Calling Week Resolution, which was adopted by the State Legislature today. The resolution declares January 20-24, 2014 as No Name-Calling Week in Michigan.

GLSEN's No Name-Calling Week, this year celebrating its 10th anniversary, is held yearly to encourage and inspire schools to celebrate kindness, engage in ongoing discussions about acceptance, and seek out solutions to end bullying and name-calling of all kinds. 

January 22, 2014

Jewlyes Gutierrez, an open transgender student in Contra Costa County, has been the center of constant harassment and bullying by her peers. Gutierrez  has been charged with misdemeanor battery for defending herself against a physical attack by three girls at Hercules High School that took place on November 13. The dispute surrounding the incident has fueled national headlines and sparked an online petition in support of Gutierrez. Family members and supporters are encouraging the Contra Costa County Superior Court to drop the criminal charges against the transgender teen.

 

Whether the students targeted this girl because she is transgender or for some unknown reason, filing charges against her sends the wrong message to LGBTQ youth. Putting an already vulnerable person through criminal prosecution does not solve the problem. We must look into what the causation for the attack was and start there. Because the school administration did not properly address the situation and no necessary action was put in place to safeguard her, Gutierrez was forced to take matters into her own hands.  No student should be in fear of their physical safety due to who they are.

 

Violence against LGBTQ youth is a serious problem. As a student who lives and attends school in Contra Costa County, I found it worrisome to hear the news of an individual being a victim of bullying and facing harsh penalties for standing up for herself, with no similar claim taken against the attackers. It is already difficult for any student to stand up against bullies. Tackling violence in schools is not a ‘first step’ that has the potential to launch more conversation; it is, right now, an eclipsing step, that has allowed us to overlook the core causes of harassment faced by LGBTQ youth.

 

No youth should feel the need to use brute force to protect themselves. School should be a safe and inclusive environment for every student. Hopefully Gutierrez will find justice, but sadly her situation is all too similar to the many struggles faced by LGBTQ youth across the nation. This incident serves as a teachable lesson to value and respect all individuals regardless of their sexuality or gender identity and expression.

 

Matthew Y. is a high school junior and a GLSEN Student Ambassador. 

January 17, 2014

I can’t believe it.  It’s been ten years since GLSEN's first No Name-Calling Week!  It’s even longer – thirteen years! – since my friends and I came up with the idea of stopping name-calling in the middle school in our little town of Paintbrush Falls, New York.  We were in the seventh grade when Addie (who is the most outspoken of the four of us) decided we should run for student council on a platform of ending name-calling and bullying.  I came up with our slogan:  “Sticks and stones may break our bones, but names will break our spirit.” 

Our idea was modest: just one day a year of nobody calling anybody else a name.

This all happened in the book The Misfits.  If you’ve read it, you may remember that I’m the one who tells the story, but it took all four of us – Addie, Skeezie, Joe, and me – to work together to bring about change.  That’s how it is sometimes:  One person can have an idea, but for the idea to translate into action, a whole community has to get behind it.

The first community to get behind our idea of stopping name-calling was the school community. Individual schools and teachers around the country took it upon themselves to teach The Misfits and find creative ways to get everyone talking about the issues we first raised in our “Forums.”  (You’ll have to read the book to know what those are.)  It was awesome.  We couldn’t believe something that started in our little town was spreading all over the country.

And then something even more amazing happened! 

This organization called GLSEN said, “Hey, we want to do something on a national level to bring attention to name-calling and remind people that kindness is much cooler than bullying.”  That’s how another community came onboard, and with the creation of GLSEN’s No Name-Calling Week in 2004, the community got really big. 

Pretty soon, hundreds and then thousands of schools began to participate. 

Sure, there were a few rough spots – like the time in 2005 when No Name-Calling Week, The Misfits, and GLSEN all came under attack for promoting the “gay agenda.”  (My friend Joe, who is gay, says the “gay agenda” is to want the same rights as everybody else, including the right to be safe in school.)  The good thing about that rough spot is that it brought a lot of attention to GLSEN’s No Name-Calling Week and before you knew it, even more schools were taking part. 

Name-calling and bullying haven’t gone away.  And cyberbulling, which wasn’t even around when The Misfits was written, has become a real problem.  But because of programs like No Name-Calling Week, communities are paying attention and more and more people think twice before they call someone a name. 

And to think it all started with a group of four misfits in a little made-up town in upstate New York.  Pretty cool.

A lot has changed in the past ten years, but my friends and I are still in the seventh grade.  That’s fiction for you!  The good news is that it’s now a better place to be.

 

James Howe, author of The Misfits, the book that inspired GLSEN’s No Name-Calling Week, wrote the above piece in the voice of its main character, Bobby Goodspeed. He has since written three more books in the voices of Bobby's friends, Joe, Addie, and Skeezie: Totally Joe, Addie on the Inside, and Also Known as Elvis (April 2014). In 2006, James Howe was honored at the GLSEN Respect Awards.

 

 

 

 

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