January 04, 2015

StopBully.govGLSEN is proud to collaborate with The Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). As part of the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention, HRSA and eight other federal agencies are working to raise awareness for bullying prevention while supporting No Name Calling Week. Through initiatives like No Name Calling Week, we can connect local leaders to the resources they need to get active and prevent bullying in their community. Whether you work in the classroom or the clinic, everyone plays a role in bullying prevention and HRSA has developed free training resources that go beyond the school environment to help you organize a community event or town hall, including:

  • Base Training Module with Speaker Notes: a presentation with suggested talking points, including the latest research to help participants create an action plan for a community event
  • Community Action Toolkit: a supplemental guide, including tip sheets, a template event agenda, action planning matrix and feedback forms

No Name Calling Week is about more than simply building awareness — it’s about taking action to prevent bullying in your neighborhood and community. Whether you’ve been active for years or just started yesterday, take action by learning about and organizing bullying prevention and response efforts in your community. Download the Training Modules at: http://www.stopbullying.gov/communityguide     

January 04, 2015

Drumroll please... April 19, 2013 is the next Day of Silence, save the date! Click the image below to share it on your Facebook! or click here to send a tweet about it! Also, buy your merchandise early and save! T-shirts are on sale for 10% off at the GLSEN store now through February 15, 2013.

January 04, 2015

No Name-Calling Week is rapidly approaching! No Name-Calling Week is an annual week of educational activities aimed at ending name-calling of all kinds and providing schools with the tools and inspiration to launch an on-going dialogue about ways to eliminate bullying in their communities. Here are some ways you can celebrate! 

  1. Conduct a school wide Name-Calling survey.
  2. Review the No Name-Calling Week Planning Guide
  3. Use Twitter and Facebook to spread the word #wordscanhurt
  4. Conduct NNCW lessons
  5. Read excerpts from “The Misfits” by James Howe and hold a group discussion.
  6. Develop a classroom no name-calling policy
  7. Create a school wide display and enter it into our Creative Expressions Contest.
  8. Show GLSEN’s Think B4 You Speak PSA and hold a discussion about the phrase “That’s So Gay”
  9. Discuss sportsmanship in physical education classes with the Changing the Game resources.
  10. Wear a No Name-Calling Week Sticker.
  11. Hold an school wide assembly on name-calling and bullying
  12. Dedicate a class to an art themed anti-bullying lesson plan
  13. Hold an essay contest "How Name Calling Makes Me Feel."
  14. Display No Name-Calling Week Posters in all classrooms and around building.
  15. Send home our Tip Sheet for Parents.

We would love to hear what you have planned; click here to let us know what you are doing to celebrate No Name-Calling Week.

January 04, 2015

Hand-made sign that read 'NO BULLYING / PEACE / NO NAME CALLING!!" in glitter puffy paint Creative Expression is an opportunity for you to show us how your school is celebrating No Name-Calling Week and creating a culture of no name-calling. We want to see your school wide displays featuring the message of No Name-Calling Week. This year’s deadline is Friday, March 1, 2013. Any kind of display can be created and a picture or video of the display will be submitted for judging. Show us your assemblies, the posters you created at school, lessons being conducted in classrooms, or anything that can show us what you are doing in your community. The winning school will receive a No Name-Calling Week Prize pack including a Simon and Schuster Children's Library, and a Stop Bullying Speak Up prize kit from the Cartoon Network. For more information about Creative Expressions or to enter your submission click here Have a great No Name-Calling Week!

January 04, 2015

When the lights came back on after GLSEN's screening of How to Survive a Plague last month, everyone in the room knew they'd seen a special film. We weren't the only ones impressed, apparently, as the movie received an Oscar nomination today for Best Documentary. How to Survive a Plague is one of the best documentaries I've ever seen, and I couldn't be more excited to see it receive national recognition. The film follows two coalitions, ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group), through the HIV/AIDS crisis during the late '80s and early '90s. The groups used political activism and civil disobedience to help shift AIDS from a near-certain death sentence to a manageable, but still serious, disease. Eliza Byard, our executive director, noted the connection between the atmosphere of the era and the birth of GLSEN: "My mother attended a founding meeting for GLSEN's New York City chapter at the time," she said, "walking through one of the very ACT UP meetings depicted in the film to a boiler room off the back where Kevin Jennings was greeting volunteers." How to Survive a Plague will compete with 5 Broken Cameras, The Gatekeepers, The Invisible War, and Searching for Sugar Man for the award. If you're interested in other documentaries about the HIV/AIDS crisis, check out We Were Here, which focuses on San Francisco, and  30 Years From Here, which reflects on three decades of HIV/AIDS in the US. Congratulations again to the director/producer David France and everyone else connected with the film!  

January 04, 2015

Here at GLSEN, we're always looking for the next big way to get the word out about the amazing work we do. Our newest tool is called a Spark, and it looks like this:

 

The Spark is an awesome way for us to highlight our work in a way that compels people to take action, which is always super important! GLSEN couldn't make such a big difference without an energized supporter base working hard across the country. This could not have come at a better time, as GLSEN is now in the running to win $1 million in the Chase American Giving Awards! Through the widget, you can watch a video where Eliza describes GLSEN's important work, follow our Twitter feed, sign up for our email list, and vote for us in the Chase American Giving Awards. There are a ton of easy ways you can help make schools safer for LGBT students by using this Spark! You can embed the player on your personal website, blog or Tumblr by clicking on the "Share" button on the Spark and copying the embed code. You can also add the Spark to your Facebook or Twitter by clicking on their respective buttons. If you haven't yet, you can always vote for GLSEN on Chase's Facebook page, and Chase card holders can vote a second time at ChaseGiving.com. This last part is super exciting: you only have to embed the Spark once to get constantly updated content from GLSEN. After the Chase Awards end, we'll be updated the Spark with new content and new calls to action on a regular basis, without you having to do a thing! Please share this cool new tool with your friends, and let's keeping working to make safe schools for ALL students in America.    

January 04, 2015

GLSEN is one of 25 charities competing for a chance to win $1 million in the Chase Community Giving Awards. Our hope of winning and expanding our work to create a world in which every child learns to value and respect all people regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression depends on your votes! Voting is now open, so don’t waste any time helping create safe schools for all students!

  1. Vote! November 27 marks the first day of the competition, so make sure you vote! You can vote once on Facebook and once more at ChaseGiving.com if you are a Chase account holder. The contest ends December 4 at 11:59 p.m.
  2. Sign up for our mailing list: Visit glsen.org/chase to sign up. By signing up to receive emails, you can stay informed of the great work your support enables GLSEN to do. Hopefully, we’ll be able to email you on December 8 with $1 million to help make safe schools.
  3. Show your support on Facebook. After you vote, you can let the world know that you chose GLSEN by “liking” us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/GLSEN. Let you friends know you voted, and ask them to show their support as well.
  4. Tell your friends about the contest. Let your friends and family know that you support making school safe for all students. After you vote for GLSEN, make sure your friends know about the amazing work GLSEN could do with $1 million.
  5. Donate a tweet a day at http://justcoz.org/glsen. Looking for an easy way to let your followers know that you support GLSEN? Donate a tweet a day and join a network of students, educators, parents, administrators, and supporters who are working to make schools safer. Your tweets will help spread the word about ways we can all make a difference!

Thank you for your support of GLSEN!  

January 04, 2015

Though Hurricane Sandy hit GLSEN’s national headquarters hard last week, we’re happy to announce that all staff and chapter leaders are safe and sound. We’re ready to get back to work making schools safer, though we aren’t able to return to the New York City office just yet. It’s not clear when the New York office will reopen, but our DC office is ready for business. That’s good news, because GLSEN will be tackling several big issues in the next few weeks, including:

  • Partnering with the DC and Baltimore public schools in support of the well-being and success of LGBT youth of color;
  • Training members of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) on LGBT issues and gender nonconformity in grades K-5; and
  • Furthering LGBT curricular inclusion with a presentation at the annual conference of the National Council for the Social Studies.

The response to the hurricane has been touching, and we are truly grateful for the overwhelming show of support. Not only from our friends at the Ad Council, who kindly offered us workspace in Manhattan, but also from countless friends of GLSEN reached out through email and social networking sites to express support. Here’s a selection of your tweets wishing us well. Thanks again for your support; it truly makes our work possible.

 

January 04, 2015

When I was a high school freshman, I came out. It was a turning point in my life and a really big decision, but when I made it I had no idea what I was getting into. I soon realized how alone I felt, being the only LGBTQ student in my school, or who I knew at all. I had some really rough times that year and sometimes felt as if no one could help me. However, something changed when I realized not only that other people were feeling the same thing, but that people who weren’t even LGBTQ were willing to stick out their necks for me. These people were my allies. No matter what choices I made or how many people were pushing against them they never left my side. They helped me pull through bullying, adjusted to new names and pronouns without question and never even considered the possibility that I was anything other than myself. These allies weren’t just students but teachers as well. It was my adviser who upon learning of my gender identity immediately put a plan in place so that my preferred name would be on all school documents. It was the teachers that when they messed up a pronoun apologized so profusely I thought they would cry. Most of all my English teacher who was so willing to start a GSA, he was ready to go against the administration for it. People have always told me that I am really brave and that I deserve something for what I am doing. I think it should work the other way around. For me it’s just about trying to be myself and be happy with my life. But for allies, they risk their own happiness and popularity for the sake of others that they might not even know. That is an outstanding quality in someone. Now that I have graduated from high school, I too have taken on the role of being an ally to LGBTQ students. I continue to keep in touch with friends in tight situations, learn about how students are doing and provide information to teachers and parents alike with resources to help the young people in their life. This Ally Week, I would like to dedicate my thanks to all they allies in my life, and whether they are near or far, they will always be in my thoughts. Have a great Ally Week and if you haven’t already please take the pledge to be an ally for all students, and help to create safe schools for everyone. -Emet Emet is a former GLSEN Student Ambassador.

January 04, 2015

Hey everyone! I’m Matthew McGibney, and I’m super excited to join GLSEN as the new communications assistant! I’ll be pitching in with the blog, so I thought I’d take a second to introduce myself. I graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill this past May, where I studied public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Attending UNC was an incredible experience, and I feel so fortunate to have been able to interact with some of the future leaders of the LGBT rights movement. GLBTSA, the university’s LGBT student organization, has a big presence on campus, and I’m proud to have sat on its board for a semester. Last year I co-chaired the ninth annual Southeast Regional Unity Conference, which brings together LGBT students and allies from across the south. The conference was primarily aimed toward college students, but the high school students in attendance brought a completely fresh perspective. It can be easy to forget how tough it is to be a high school student trying to establish a GSA or participate in Day of Silence after you’ve graduated, but the students truly reminded me that those challenges are a real struggle every day. At the same time, seeing 400 LGBT college students living open lives made just as much of an impact on the high school students, many of whom came from places that were not as LGBT-friendly as Chapel Hill. I hope those students realized that it does get better, but that there's no reason you can't change your world today. I’m excited to have joined GLSEN, and I hope I can do my part to make a better world a reality. Best, Matthew  

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