May 03, 2013

GLSEN is growing! During our October meeting, the GLSEN Board of Directors voted to accredit two new Chapters into the network. GLSEN New York City and GLSEN Hawai’i have now joined more than 35 Chapters from across the country in creating safe schools for all students. We asked one of GLSEN New York City’s co-chairs, James Michael Angelo, what inspired him to start a Chapter in the vast and bustling Big Apple: I started this Chapter to help carry the message of hope that GLSEN has powerfully packaged to the ones who still suffer from the effects of bullying. Using the incredible system and set of tools that GLSEN provides and the local spirit of everyday New Yorkers we as GLSEN New York City look forward to furthering this amazing movement one student at a time. When one human being shares their experience with another, in the confines of a common goal, beautiful change can happen. The language of the heart is a powerful tool when shifting hearts and minds. We know that New York City will be served well with such passion and heartfelt conviction. In addition, GLSEN Hawai’i’s co-chair, Nick Aiello, shares how his Chapter will be using more than the aloha spirit to support the youth in the nation’s 50th state: GLSEN Hawai’i is gravely important to ensure our LGBT youth have an educational experience where they feel included, safe, and supported regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.  GLSEN Hawai’i is dedicated towards working with educators and their administration in creating safe and inclusive environments in all facets of school.  We will strive to empower students to concurrently be advocates in their communities as well as become leaders for the next generation of LGBT youth in all the islands’ K-12 schools. With the accreditation of these two outstanding Chapters, GLSEN is now serving communities in 23 states spanning coast to coast. They will work with students, educators and community leaders in organizing GLSEN days of action, administering educator professional development opportunities, and ensuring students have a safe space to learn in their school environment. Their work, like all other GLSEN Chapters, will serve as an essential resource for students in their communities. Welcome GLSEN New York City and GLSEN Hawai’i!   If you would like to start a Chapter in your local community, click here.  

May 03, 2013

Today it’s hard for me to imagine life before GLSEN. I never felt safe. I used to be sick with fear going to school every day. There was a group of students who used to follow me as I walked down the hallway shoving me into lockers. It seemed like every morning they got more and more aggressive. Even worse, during a football game, one threatened to kill me. Luckily, I found GLSEN. GLSEN helped me realize that no one has the right to bully and harass me. I’m a good person … an out and PROUD gay kid! GLSEN gives me hope! Thanks to GLSEN, I am learning to tell my story and become an advocate for change. But we can’t change our schools without your support. Please help this amazing organization continue its vital work on behalf of LGBT and allied students.

I am just one of hundreds of thousands of LGBT students across the nation who are helped by GLSEN every day. Without GLSEN … and without you … I know I wouldn’t be where I am today. By supporting GLSEN, you are investing in the future — in students who learn to survive, thrive and lead — students like me! Thank you. Jeremy Jeremy is a second-year GLSEN Media Ambassador and is in the 10th grade in Fargo, North Dakota. 

May 03, 2013

With 2012 quickly coming to a close, many will look back over what has happened in these past twelve months and be thankful for what they have. At GLSEN, we are thankful for you. It has been a great year for GLSEN and the safe schools movement, full of benchmarks and achievements. To give you a sense of some of our successes this year, GLSEN has put together a short montage capturing many of our 2012 highlights. I hope you will take a minute to watch.

Everything we have achieved this past year has been possible because of you. And everything we hope to achieve going forward will be as well. On behalf of all of us at GLSEN, and the hundreds of thousands of LGBT and allied students we serve every day, thank you. P.S. For other great videos from this past year, visit the GLSEN YouTube channel.

May 03, 2013

Here at GLSEN, we're always looking for the next big way to get the word out about the amazing work we do. Our newest tool is called a Spark, and it looks like this:

 

The Spark is an awesome way for us to highlight our work in a way that compels people to take action, which is always super important! GLSEN couldn't make such a big difference without an energized supporter base working hard across the country. This could not have come at a better time, as GLSEN is now in the running to win $1 million in the Chase American Giving Awards! Through the widget, you can watch a video where Eliza describes GLSEN's important work, follow our Twitter feed, sign up for our email list, and vote for us in the Chase American Giving Awards. There are a ton of easy ways you can help make schools safer for LGBT students by using this Spark! You can embed the player on your personal website, blog or Tumblr by clicking on the "Share" button on the Spark and copying the embed code. You can also add the Spark to your Facebook or Twitter by clicking on their respective buttons. If you haven't yet, you can always vote for GLSEN on Chase's Facebook page, and Chase card holders can vote a second time at ChaseGiving.com. This last part is super exciting: you only have to embed the Spark once to get constantly updated content from GLSEN. After the Chase Awards end, we'll be updated the Spark with new content and new calls to action on a regular basis, without you having to do a thing! Please share this cool new tool with your friends, and let's keeping working to make safe schools for ALL students in America.    

May 03, 2013

GLSEN is one of 25 charities competing for a chance to win $1 million in the Chase Community Giving Awards. Our hope of winning and expanding our work to create a world in which every child learns to value and respect all people regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression depends on your votes! Voting is now open, so don’t waste any time helping create safe schools for all students!

  1. Vote! November 27 marks the first day of the competition, so make sure you vote! You can vote once on Facebook and once more at ChaseGiving.com if you are a Chase account holder. The contest ends December 4 at 11:59 p.m.
  2. Sign up for our mailing list: Visit glsen.org/chase to sign up. By signing up to receive emails, you can stay informed of the great work your support enables GLSEN to do. Hopefully, we’ll be able to email you on December 8 with $1 million to help make safe schools.
  3. Show your support on Facebook. After you vote, you can let the world know that you chose GLSEN by “liking” us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/GLSEN. Let you friends know you voted, and ask them to show their support as well.
  4. Tell your friends about the contest. Let your friends and family know that you support making school safe for all students. After you vote for GLSEN, make sure your friends know about the amazing work GLSEN could do with $1 million.
  5. Donate a tweet a day at http://justcoz.org/glsen. Looking for an easy way to let your followers know that you support GLSEN? Donate a tweet a day and join a network of students, educators, parents, administrators, and supporters who are working to make schools safer. Your tweets will help spread the word about ways we can all make a difference!

Thank you for your support of GLSEN!  

May 03, 2013

A Transgender Day of Remembrance vigil. A silhouetted person holds a candle in the foregrounded, a person with long dirty blonde hair reads from a pamphlet out of focus in the background Today is the International Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), a day to reflect on the violence and loss caused by anti-transgender fear, discrimination and hatred. We remember those lost, and re-commit ourselves to building a better world. For me and my GLSEN colleagues, the commitment to the safety and well-being of transgender students is core to our purpose of building true cultures of respect in K-12 schools. Sadly, it is also one of the most urgent and challenging elements of our current work. GLSEN's report, Harsh Realities: The Experiences of Transgender Youth in Our Nation’s Schools – the first national report on transgender student experiences – found that a shocking 53% of transgender students had been physically harassed and 26% had been physically assaulted at school in the past year because of their gender expression. For adult transgender people, the threat is even greater: 264 transgender people were murdered in hate crimes worldwide in the past year. The price of difference, of not conforming to gender norms, is far too high. Changing this dire reality means building respect for difference, and for transgender and gender nonconforming people specifically, from the ground up. Earlier this year, we published Ready, Set, Respect! GLSEN's Elementary School Toolkit to provide the tools for elementary educators to better understand how gender roles and expectations can contribute to a hostile school climate. Released in partnership with the National Association of Elementary School Principals and the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Ready, Set, Respect! provides K-5 teachers with developmentally appropriate, standards-aligned lesson plans on bias-based bullying, gender roles and the full measure of respect. Students are also leading the way on this critical issue. Today, GLSEN is partnering with Gay-Straight Alliances and student leaders across the country to enlist broader support for transgender students among their peers with a special pledge. It’s a message for all of us: I pledge to support transgender and gender nonconforming youth by making a commitment to:

  • Not use gender-biased language or transphobic slurs.
  • Not assume anyone's gender identity and ask respectfully how a person identifies.
  • Respect the diversity of all gender identities and expressions.

You may not currently be in school or work in a school, but these are certainly steps we can all take, and I encourage you to take the pledge here as well. Please check out our action page to find other ways to get involved and to learn about other GLSEN resources designed to create safer, more affirming schools for transgender youth, like our Model District Policy on Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Youth (pdf) created in partnership with the National Center for Transgender Equality. Schools must be safe spaces for EVERY child. Difference must be valued in our schools and in our society. And the scourge of violence perpetrated against transgender people of all ages must become a thing of the past. Thank you for committing to take a critical step forward on this day of remembrance, and for your continued support of our work.

May 03, 2013

For those invested in equality for LGBT people, last night's election had several primary story lines – races and issues that loomed large on Twitter and our personal networks but that were not always front and center in the mainstream coverage. We bit our nails and sought out the latest returns until the historic results became clear:

  • Tammy Baldwin became the first out Senator ever;
  • Marriage equality won popular votes in Maine and Maryland, and is currently leading in Washington state, the first time ever that same-sex couples won the right to marry at the polls;
  • An effort to ban same-sex marriage in Minnesota was defeated at the polls;
  • A pro-marriage equality Justice of the Iowa Courts was reelected despite being targeted by anti-LGBT forces;
  • The nation reelected a President who endorsed marriage equality, LGBT students' rights, and LGBT-inclusive bullying-prevention legislation; repealed Don't Ask, Don't Tell and refused to defend the "Defense of Marriage Act"; led federal agencies that have sought to act in the interest of LGBT people, particularly youth; and appointed LGBT people, including GLSEN's founding Executive Director Kevin Jennings, to a remarkable number of positions in his administration.

These victories for equality – whatever one thinks of the results of the Presidential election – underscore changing attitudes toward LGBT issues in our society that are the result of decades of hard work to change laws, to reach hearts and minds, and to integrate the lives and needs of LGBT people into policy and practice in this country wherever possible. And all of that change was possible only because of coalition-building and years of effort to build strong partnerships for equality and justice across communities and lines of difference. If you’ve made it this far, I ask you to pause for a moment and reread that previous sentence. That idea can become a cliché, stripped of meaning from overuse. But this election and the internal debates now looming for the Republican Party underscore powerfully what those concepts – coalition-building and partnership – really mean. This was brought home for me powerfully this morning when I heard a conservative commentator respond to the suggestion that the Republican Party might need to rethink its approach to an increasingly diverse electorate in order to build a new majority. Current Republican strategy has its roots in the late 1960s, when a young Pat Buchanan suggested to Richard Nixon that the party could divide the country in half and win by retaining the “larger half.” In other words, no need to broaden your base, just create a sharp, dividing line, and motivate those who agree with you by any means necessary. Asked if the party might need to do more to bring new communities into its base, the commentator replied: "Ideas trump all. When you broaden the base, you weaken the foundation. You begin to lose sight of what you stand for." His comment efficiently killed a discussion of alternative Republican approaches to advancing conservative ideas. In a way, he succinctly articulated the polar opposite of a coalition and partnership-based approach: a commitment to ideological purity over the kind of strategic clarity that powers great coalitions and effective partnerships. An approach that says "This is what you must each believe and act on" rather than "this is what we intend to accomplish together and let’s agree on how we will work together to achieve that goal." For twenty years, GLSEN has stood firmly for a coalition and partnership based approach to the long, hard work of change. Sometimes we have sought power from others in alliance, sometimes we brought our own power to bear on a common goal. Always, we have tried to do the listening and thinking and negotiating required to bring people and organizations together on common ground for a common purpose. Our mission statement articulates GLSEN's commitment to valuing difference itself for the contribution it makes to a diverse and healthy society. Last night we saw the incredible power of difference assembled for a common purpose to drive victories for equality and justice. The power to bring us closer to the day when each member of every school community learns to respect and accept all people regardless of sexual orientation, gender expression or gender identity. It is our youth who still struggle, in the hallways and classrooms where they spend their days, for the very basic tenet of equality – respect. That is why GLSEN has made passage of the Safe Schools Improvement Act and Student Non-Discrimination Act a priority. I am hopeful that the historic nature of yesterday’s election will help bring passage of these important bills closer to reality, and help ensure safe environments for every student to thrive.  

May 03, 2013

Though Hurricane Sandy hit GLSEN’s national headquarters hard last week, we’re happy to announce that all staff and chapter leaders are safe and sound. We’re ready to get back to work making schools safer, though we aren’t able to return to the New York City office just yet. It’s not clear when the New York office will reopen, but our DC office is ready for business. That’s good news, because GLSEN will be tackling several big issues in the next few weeks, including:

  • Partnering with the DC and Baltimore public schools in support of the well-being and success of LGBT youth of color;
  • Training members of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) on LGBT issues and gender nonconformity in grades K-5; and
  • Furthering LGBT curricular inclusion with a presentation at the annual conference of the National Council for the Social Studies.

The response to the hurricane has been touching, and we are truly grateful for the overwhelming show of support. Not only from our friends at the Ad Council, who kindly offered us workspace in Manhattan, but also from countless friends of GLSEN reached out through email and social networking sites to express support. Here’s a selection of your tweets wishing us well. Thanks again for your support; it truly makes our work possible.

 

May 03, 2013

Al Franken is a U.S. senator from Minnesota and a lead sponsor on the Student Nondiscrimination Act. Here's his Ally Week message:

I’m proud to celebrate Ally Week with GLSEN and Gay-Straight Alliances around the country—and I’m especially proud to be one of their allies. We will only succeed in stopping anti-LGBT bullying and harassment in our nation’s schools by locking arms and standing united—young and old, gay and straight—against discrimination. If we do this, it will only be a matter of time before we pass the Student Non-Discrimination Act and the Safe Schools Improvement Act, two pieces of legislation which will go a long way in guaranteeing safe and effective schools for all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

May 03, 2013

Today marks the last “official” day of GLSEN’s Ally Week. While designated activities, assemblies and other programs are winding down, we know the need for individuals to stand up against bullying and bias never really ends. That’s why GLSEN is hard at work year-round, fighting for the rights of LGBT students. We envision a future where all students can attend school in an affirming, safe, respectful environment free of bigotry, bullying and hatred. We cannot do it alone. We need your support.

Please make a special contribution to GLSEN today. Help us continue the fight to end LGBT bullying and bias!

I recently met a young student, Margaret, an out lesbian, who told me about how she once had to sit in class while her teacher asked every single student in the room if they thought she was going to hell because of her sexual orientation. Can you imagine how different she would have felt if an Ally spoke up on her behalf? Stories like Margaret's re-affirm the need for programs like Ally Week, ensuring that young LGBT students have strong, visible support. GLSEN is helping Margaret get that support, making sure she has an Ally, making sure she has hope.

Help bring hope to thousands of students like Margaret. Make a special contribution to GLSEN today!

Together we can create the future that our students deserve — together we can make a change!

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